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The true impact of uranium mining
 
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Views: 1165 News24
Uranium Mining in US and Canada in the 1970s
 
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Physically removing the rock ore generally involves either open-pit mining or underground mining. Milling is the process that removes uranium from the ore, which is mostly obtained in open-pit and underground mines. Once at the mill, the ore is crushed and ground up, and treated with chemical solutions to dissolve the uranium, which is then recovered from the solution. Tailings are the wastes from the millings processes and are stored in mill tailings impoundments, a specially designed waste disposal facility. Since 1979, when uranium mine workers began being diagnosed with lung diseases, such as cancer, regulators have gradually tightened controls and mandated improved uranium mining practices. Recently, officials also have become concerned with the broader impacts of uranium mining on public health and the environment. Workers are directly exposed to the radiation hazards of uranium mines. Uranium mining also releases radon from the ground into the atmosphere. Mines and mining waste can release radionuclides, including radon, and other pollutants to streams, springs, and other bodies of water. Federal and state agencies have established pollutant discharge limits and drinking water standards, and continue to monitor these sites for public safety. Uranium mine waste from operations that closed before the mid-1970s are of particular concern. In many cases, these mines remain unclaimed and the waste is still piled near the mine. Weathering can lead to radioactive dust that is blown by the wind and the seepage of contaminants into the surface and groundwater. There are also cases of unclaimed uranium mine waste being used for house construction, which creates significant radon and radiation hazard for inhabitants. For more information on the hazards of uranium, go to USEPA website http://www.epa.gov/radtown/basic.html . This is clipped from the late 1970's BBC Production, Energy From The Crust, showing uranium mining activities and equipment and including footage from the following uranium mines: Schwartzwalder Mine, Near Boulder, Colorado King Solomon Mine near Uravan, Colorado and the Key Lake Mine in Saskatchewan, Canada. The entire film is available at the Internet Archive.
Views: 18274 markdcatlin
Uranium Mining Impacts Pt. 1 of 3
 
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The International Forum on Globalization's Claire Greensfelder chairs a panel of indigenous and minority activists from around the world detailing the catastrophic impacts of uranium mining and the nuclear fuel cycle on their various cultures, people and ecosystems. From the American Southwest to Alaska; from Niger to Kazakhstan; from uranium mines in Australia and India to reprocessing plants in France, Japan and the State of Georgia, indigenous and minority communities testify to horrendous health and environmental devastation that shows the current industry push for a 'nuclear renaissance' to be nothing less than genocidal. For more info: www.dont-nuke-the-climate.org www.IFG.org www.DineCARE.org www.SortirDuNucleaire.fr
Views: 1390 eon3
The Legacy of Uranium Mine Waste in Elliot Lake (1of3)
 
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Between a Rock and a Hard Place - what to do with Uranium mine waste? (released in Sept 1994) Part 1 of 3 This documentary examines the environmental impact of the Uranium mine operations in Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada
Views: 3822 Arthur YUL
Between a Rock and a Hard Place - what to do with Uranium mine waste?
 
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This documentary examines the environmental impact of that the Uranium mine operations in Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada have had on the environment. director, editor, narrator: Arthur Pequegnat
Views: 448 Arthur YUL
Uranium Mining Leaves Toxic Nuclear Legacy on Indigenous Land
 
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The iconic Grand Canyon is the site of a battle over toxic uranium mining. Last year, a company called Energy Fuels Resources was given federal approval to reopen a mine six miles from the Grand Canyon's popular South Rim entrance. A coalition of Native and environmental groups have protested the decision, saying uranium mining could strain scarce water sources and pose serious health effects. Diné (Navajo) tribal lands are littered with abandoned uranium mines. From 1944 to 1986, 3.9 million tons of uranium ore were chiseled and blasted from the mountains and plains of the region. More than 1,000 mines have closed, but the mining companies never properly disposed of their radioactive waste piles, leading to a spike in cancer rates and other health ailments.
Views: 913 freespeechtv
Canadian Activists Target Uranium Industry
 
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http://EnergyInvestingNews.org/ The Community Coalition Against Mining Uranium is demanding that uranium exploration be suspended in Ontario until its impact on health, the environment and aboriginal land rights is properly addressed. uranium stock news Cameco (CCJ)
Views: 213 EnergyInvestingNews
The Nuclear Grave of India - Jadugoda
 
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My 2nd stop during the 900 km solo cycling expedition through Jharkhand was Jadugoda, the nuclear capital of Jharkhand. Since 1967, Uranium Corporation of India Limited has been mining and processing Uranium here. The radiation exposure resulting from utter disregard for health and safety compliances has resulted in a living nightmare for the locals. Cancer, birth defects, miscarriages and sterility are commonplace. Here is what i saw while interacting with the villagers near Jadugoda mines. Music: Balmorhea - Remembrance
Views: 30780 Karma Traveler
Uranium Mining
 
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The health and environmental damage caused by uranium mining, narrated by Dr. Alex Rosen of IPPNW Germany.
Views: 248 IPPNW1
WUS2015 Uranium mining wastes in North-America: best practices & issues
 
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PAUL ROBINSON (USA) Research director, Southwest Research and Information Centre THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium addressed issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium was organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future of nuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 48 Uranium2015
"A Slow Genocide of the People": Uranium Mining Leaves Toxic Nuclear Legacy on Indigenous Land
 
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http://www.democracynow.org - The iconic Grand Canyon is the site of a battle over toxic uranium mining. Last year, a company called Energy Fuels Resources was given federal approval to reopen a mine six miles from the Grand Canyon's popular South Rim entrance. A coalition of Native and environmental groups have protested the decision, saying uranium mining could strain scarce water sources and pose serious health effects. Diné (Navajo) tribal lands are littered with abandoned uranium mines. From 1944 to 1986, 3.9 million tons of uranium ore were chiseled and blasted from the mountains and plains of the region. More than 1,000 mines have closed, but the mining companies never properly disposed of their radioactive waste piles, leading to a spike in cancer rates and other health ailments. Broadcasting from Flagstaff, Arizona, we speak with Taylor McKinnon, director of energy with Grand Canyon Trust, and Klee Benally, a Diné (Navajo) activist and musician. "It's really a slow genocide of the people, not just indigenous people of this region, but it's estimated that there are over 10 million people who are residing within 50 miles of abandoned uranium mines," Benally says. Benally also describes the struggle to preserve the San Francisco Peaks, an area considered sacred by 13 Native tribes, where the Snowbowl ski resort is using treated sewage water to make snow. Democracy Now!, is an independent global news hour that airs weekdays on 1,200+ TV and radio stations Monday through Friday. Watch our livestream 8-9am ET at http://www.democracynow.org. Please consider supporting independent media by making a donation to Democracy Now! today, visit http://owl.li/ruJ5Q. FOLLOW DEMOCRACY NOW! ONLINE: Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/democracynow Twitter: @democracynow Subscribe on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/democracynow Listen on SoundCloud: http://www.soundcloud.com/democracynow Daily Email News Digest: http://www.democracynow.org/subscribe Google+: https://plus.google.com/+DemocracyNow Instagram: http://instagram.com/democracynow Tumblr: http://democracynow.tumblr.com Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/democracynow/
Views: 9559 Democracy Now!
MINING IN NUNAVUT/ URANIUM MINING IN CANADIAN ARCTIC
 
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"People Can Stand Up" What do you think of mining in the Canadian Arctic?? The Inuit organizations of Nunavut have recently opened the way to uranium mining. Some Nunavut residents want to voice their concerns and created a grassroots organization to ask for a public inquiry; should Nunavut open the way to nuclear energy or not? "Show Me On The Map: Discussions on Mining on Aboriginal Lands" is an online blog discussing the social, economic, and environmental issues surrounding mining in the Canadian Arctic. Visit http://www.isuma.tv/hi/en/showmeonthemap to hear the concerns of those living in these communities relating to future mining prospects. Visit www.isuma.tv for over 2,600 videos in more than 46 languages, dedicated to Indigenous media from around the world.
Views: 5420 IsumaTV
The Legacy of Uranium Mine Waste in Elliot Lake (3of3)
 
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Between a Rock and a Hard Place - what to do with Uranium mine waste? (released in Sept 1994) Part 3 of 3 This documentary examines the environmental impact of the Uranium mine operations in Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada
Views: 1126 Arthur YUL
The Nuclear Waste Problem
 
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Get smart with Brilliant for 20% off by being one of the first 500 people to sign up at http://brilliant.org/wendover Subscribe to Half as Interesting (The other channel from Wendover Productions): https://www.youtube.com/halfasinteresting Check out my podcast with Brian from Real Engineering: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/showmakers/id1224583218?mt=2 (iTunes link) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_10vJJqf2ZK0lWrb5BXAPg (YouTube link) Support Wendover Productions on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/wendoverproductions Get a Wendover Productions t-shirt for $20: https://store.dftba.com/products/wendover-productions-shirt Youtube: http://www.YouTube.com/WendoverProductions Twitter: http://www.Twitter.com/WendoverPro Email: WendoverProductions@gmail.com Reddit: http://Reddit.com/r/WendoverProductions Animation by Josh Sherrington (https://www.youtube.com/heliosphere) Sound by Graham Haerther (http://www.Haerther.net) Thumbnail by Joe Cieplinski (http://joecieplinski.com/) Nuclear reactor footage courtesy Canada Science and Technology Museum Spent fuel pool courtesy IAEA Imagebank Onkalo photo courtesy Posiva Music: "Raw Deal" by Gunner Olsen, "Divider" by Chris Zabriskie, "My Luck" by Broke for Free, and "I Wanted to Live" by Lee Rosevere Big thanks to Patreon supporters: Kevin Song, David Cichowski, Andy Tran, Victor Zimmer, Paul Jihoon Choi, Dylan Benson, M van Kasbergen, Etienne Dechamps, Adil Abdulla, Arunabh Chattopadhyay, Ieng Chi Hin, Ken Rutabana, John Johnston, Connor J Smith, Rob Harvey, Arkadiy Kulev, Hagai Bloch Gadot, Aitan Magence, Eyal Matsliah, Sihien Goh, Joseph Bull, Marcelo Alves Vieira, Hank Green, Plinio Correa, Brady Bellini
Views: 1227349 Wendover Productions
WUS2015 Community & uranium mining issues in Africa
 
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PEER DE RIJK (NETHERLANDS) International executive director, World Information Service on Energy (WISE) BRUNO CHAREYRON (FRANCE) Nuclear physic engineer, director of the CRIIRAD laboratory MAMADOU DIALLO (MALI) Member of the Association of Citizens and Friends of Faléa Commune (ARACF) DAVID BAYANG (CAMEROON ) Deputy National Coordinator, National Service for Justice and Peace THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium addressed issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium was organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future of nuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 154 Uranium2015
Environmental and Public Health Impacts of Experimental Uranium Mining in Meghalaya!
 
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The full scale mining of uranium in my native land should be blocked and stopped at all cost.
Views: 1416 Bremley Lyngdoh
The Legacy of Uranium Mine Waste in Elliot Lake  (2of3)
 
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Between a Rock and a Hard Place - what to do with Uranium mine waste? (released in Sept 1994) Part 2 of 3 This documentary examines the environmental impact of the Uranium mine operations in Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada
Views: 1146 Arthur YUL
Uranium Mining Pollutes Drinking Water
 
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Art Dohman, Chairman of the Goliad County Uranium Research Advisory Committee, describes pollution in local drinking water aquifers caused by uranium mining in Texas.
Views: 3522 UraniumInfo
Medical Effects of Uranium Mining on Population & Native Peoples (Dr. Caldicott & Prof. Brugge)
 
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http://ifyoulovethisplanet.org/?p=5785 Dr. Helen Caldicott's websites: http://ifyoulovethisplanet.org http://nuclearfreeplanet.org/ http://www.helencaldicott.com/ "Prof. Doug Brugge on the medical effects of uranium mining and how mining particularly harms Native peoples" This week's guest is Doug Brugge, a professor in the Department of Public Health and Community Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts. He is the author of The Navajo People and Uranium Mining and the associate editor of the Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. His research includes studies of asthma; the impact of culture and language on health communication; the impact of environmental tobacco smoke; traffic pollution and cardiovascular disease; and the impact of uranium mining and processing on Native Americans. Prof. Brugge and Dr. Caldicott cover how they both started their antinuclear activism with Native peoples in the U.S. and Australia, respectively. Topics discussed in this episode include the health effects of radon, how uranium mining induces lung cancer, the cover-up of the harm caused to Native American uranium miners and their communities, the enlargement of uranium mining operations in Australia and elsewhere, and how Native peoples in many places, from India to Canada to North America and Australia, find themselves in harm's way when their land is found to contain mineable uranium. Relevant to this interview are the articles Australia's aboriginal communities clamour against uranium mining, http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2010/aug/09/austrailia-aboriginal-uranium-mining Aborigines to block uranium mining after Japan disaster http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/australasia/aborigines-to-block-uranium-mining-after-japan-disaster-2267467.html and Uranium Contamination Haunts Navajo Country http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/27/us/27navajo.html?_r=1 FAIR USE NOTICE: Any copyrighted (©) material is made available to advance understanding of ecological, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and social justice issues, which constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. See also: Nuclear Regulatory Commission daily reports (what's happening at nuclear plants near you): http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/doc-collections/event-status/event/2012/ Union of Concerned Scientists (watchdog over NRC): http://www.ucsusa.org/nuclear_power/ Articles compiled by Dr. Helen Caldicott: Fukushima Nuclear Plant at High Risk for Major Earthquake http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2012/02/14-2 Fears Growing as Fukushima Reactor Temperature Rising http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2012/02/12-0 Temperature Soars Mysteriously Inside Fukushima Nuclear Reactor http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2012/02/06-0 Fukushima: A Nuclear War without a War: The Unspoken Crisis of Worldwide Nuclear Radiation http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=28870 French Scientists: Childhood Leukemia Spikes Near Nuclear Reactors https://www.commondreams.org/view/2012/01/26-2 Japanese Govt Kept Secret Worst-Case Scenario Post-Fukushima https://www.commondreams.org/headline/2012/01/22-4 Cesium from Fukushima plant fell all over Japan http://ajw.asahi.com/article/0311disaster/fukushima/AJ201111260001 Fukushima cesium 'equals 168 Hiroshimas' http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/asia-pacific/japan/110825/fuk... After Fukushima: Enough Is Enough by Helen Caldicott http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/02/opinion/magazine-global-agenda-enough-is-en... Women Fight to Save Fukushima's Children http://www.truth-out.org/women-fight-save-fukushimas-children/1320681047 Japan must say no to nuclear! http://www.newint.org/features/web-exclusive/2011/12/20/japan-must-say-no-to-... Nuclear News and Updates: http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/2011/04/fukushima-i-nuke-plant-japan-nuclear.html http://enenews.com/ http://fukushima-diary.com/ http://fukushimaupdate.com/ http://nukefree.org/ http://www.llrc.org/ http://enformable.com/ http://radioactive.eu.com/ http://masterofmanythings.com/radiation_updates.html http://www.scoop.it/t/nuclear-news-what-the-physics http://blog.safecast.org/ http://www.nuc.berkeley.edu/UCBAirSampling http://www.enviroreporter.com/ http://fukushimaemergencywhatcanwedo.blogspot.com/2011/09/nuclear-expert-says... http://enformable.com/2011/09/nuclear-experts-say-fukushima-is-turning-out-to... http://www.nuclearhealth.org/ http://japanfocus.org/-Say_Peace-Project/3549 http://changeagents2011.wordpress.com/ http://robertsingleton.wordpress.com/ http://www.nirs.org/reactorwatch/accidents/Fukushimafactsheet.pdf http://capitoilette.com/2011/12/30/the-party-line-december-30-2011-the-party-...
Views: 2005 rumorecurioso
Gabon:The impact of Areva's uranium mining
 
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Report - Gabon:The impact of Areva's uranium mining For 40 years Comuf, a subsidiary of French nuclear giant Areva, mined uranium in the town of Mounana, in southern Gabon. The operation has had serious consequences for the health of the workers and locals. Many former miners, both Gabonese and French, have died of lung cancer. Under pressure from NGOs, Areva opened a medical clinic last October. But the staff here don't all have the training or resources to properly diagnose diseases linked to uranium mining.
Views: 4150 FRANCE 24 English
Uranium mining could impact local water
 
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Uranium mining could impact local water
Views: 433 WAVY TV 10
Jharkhand Forum - Jadugoda Uranium Mine - 1 | Website: jadugoda.jharkhand.org.in
 
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Jharkhand Forum - Jadugoda Uranium Mine - 1 | Website: http://jadugoda.jharkhand.org.in
Views: 8178 jharkhandforum
WUS2015  Notions of Radioactivity and Issues of Uranium Mining Sites in Germany
 
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GORDON EDWARDS (CANADA, QC) Ph.D., mathematician/physicist, president of the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility GUNTER WIPPEL (GERMANY) Cofounder of Uranium Network and co-organizer of the first World Uranium Hearings (Austria, 1992) THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium will address issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium is organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future ofnuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 39 Uranium2015
Left in the Dust - uranium mining in Niger
 
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Uranium mining by French nuclear company AREVA poses a serious threat to the environment and people of northern Niger in West Africa
Dr. Jim Harding - Canada's Deadly Secret
 
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In this video, professor, researcher and author Dr. Jim Harding reveals the impact of uranium mining on everything from public health to nuclear weapons. Addressing aboriginal rights, the environment, the epidemic of cancer and the international nuclear industry, he presents an alternative vision linking energy, health, and sovereignty to a sustainable and peaceful future. © 2007/2008 Lazarus Productions © 2007 Modea Communications
Views: 2218 Victoria Indy TV
Uranium - Let's Talk About It
 
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What is it, what is it used for, how does it do what it does? This animated video created by the Saskatchewan Environmental Society looks at these questions, the environmental impacts of the mining and waste management processes, and the issue of whether we should be mining it in Saskatchewan. (25 minutes)
PLENARY 3 Uranium Mining, Health & The Environment: Pulling it Together
 
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Summary of workshops with Jim Harding (facilitator) (Canada) Retired professor, University of Regina THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium addressed issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium was organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future of nuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 45 Uranium2015
Protection Against Radioactivity in Uranium Mines circa 1970 CharlieDeanArchives - The Best Document
 
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US Bureau of Mines film from 1969. Shows how to protect uranium miners from the effects of radon and its daughter products. Shows ventilation theory, uranium . This documentary examines the environmental impact of that the Uranium mine operations in Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada have had on the environment. director . Charmaine White Face of Defenders of the Black Hills joins the Walk for a New Spring to talk about uranium mining, Americas Chernobyl, and a nuclear free . What is uranium? Where does it come from? How is it used? U 4 Uranium? addresses these questions and more in a unique portrait of one of the planets .
Views: 11 Alyce Adams
Perth's strategic environmental assessment and Toro Uranium mine
 
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In this session Scott asks whether the reason the Strategic Environmental Assessment of Perth and Peel is two years overdue so that Barnett can keep demolishing places of significant environmental value the assessment would protect? And what's the progress on the Toro uranium mine?
WUS 2015 PLENARY 1 URANIUM MINING & THE NUCLEAR FUEL CHAIN: ISSUES & CONTROVERSIES
 
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MARIETTE LIEFFERINK (SOUTH-AFRICA) CEO of Federation for a Sustainable Environment IAN FAIRLIE (UK) Scientist, former advisor to UK government, now independent consultant on radiological risks HELEN MARY CALDICOTT (AUSTRALIA) Physician, cofounder of Physicians for Social Responsibility, well-known author on nuclear issues THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium will address issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium is organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future ofnuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 196 Uranium2015
Devastating impact uranium mining continues to have on Native lands
 
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Further informations about topics addressed are available in favourites, play lists on this, my main channel http://www.youtube.com/user/sundrumify and complementary video responses. Published with the permission of "DemocracyNow.org DemocracyNow.org - New Mexico's long history of uranium mining on Native American lands provides fuel for the front end of the nuclear industry and stores much of the mine tailings and radioactive waste from nuclear weapons and power plants. We look at the devastating impact uranium mining continues to have on Native lands with Leona Morgan of Eastern Navajo Diné Against Uranium Mining, a group dedicated to protecting the water, air, land and health of communities in areas impacted by uranium mines. We're also joined by Jay Coghlan of Nuclear Watch New Mexico and former Los Alamos National Laboratory investigator Chuck Montaño. To watch the entire weekday independent news hour, read the transcript, download the podcast, search our vast archive, or to find more information about Democracy Now! and Amy Goodman, visit http://www.democracynow.org.
Views: 1077 GeneratorJun
Miners Confronted at Grand Canyon Uranium Mine - Haulno.org
 
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Indigenous & environmental advocates confronted workers at the Canyon Mine on March 12, 2017. Energy Fuel's Canyon Mine is located just miles from the Grand Canyon and is desecrating Red Butte, a site sacred to Havasupai, Diné, & Hopi Nations. Learn more, sign our pledge of resistance, and donate here: www.haulno.org Video by www.cleanupthemines Edited by www.indigenousaction.org
Views: 837 IndigenousAction
Global Mining and The Ugly Canadian
 
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Yves Engler: The Canadian Harper government actively interferes in the affairs of other countries on behalf of mining companies registered in Canada
Views: 4888 TheRealNews
Heavy Metal: A Mining Disaster in Northern Quebec – Feature, Documentary
 
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Heavy Metal: A Mining Disaster in Northern Quebec is a documentary about the environmental devastation caused by toxic mining waste and its impact on a small Northern community. Heavy Metal: A Mining Disaster in Northern Quebec est un documentaire exposant les conséquences d’une catastrophe écologique provoquée par le déversement des déchets toxiques d’une mine située dans une petite communauté du Nord québécois. Subscribe to the Encore+ channel: http://bit.ly/EncoreSubscribe Abonnez-vous à la chaîne Encore+: http://bit.ly/EncoreSubscribe 2005 Available only in English. / Disponible en anglais seulement. Produced by/ Produit par : Ernest Webb. Director/Réal. : Neil Diamond. Encore+ invites you to discover – or rediscover – memorable Canadian films and TV shows, wherever you are in the world. Brought to you by the Canada Media Fund and its partners. Follow Encore+: http://www.facebook.com/EncorePlusMedia http://www.instagram.com/EncorePlusMedia http://www.twitter.com/EncorePlusMedia Encore+ vous invite à voir ou revoir des émissions et des films canadiens mémorables, où que vous soyez dans le monde. Une initiative du Fonds des médias du Canada et de ses partenaires. Suivez Encore+: http://www.facebook.com/EncorePlusMedia http://www.instagram.com/EncorePlusMedia http://www.twitter.com/EncorePlusMedia #HeavyMetalMiningDisaster #encoreplus #Documentary #CMF #Canada #Film #Feature #HeavyMetal #MiningDisaster #NorthernQuebec
Views: 325 Encore +
Olympic Dam mine expansion- Environmental impacts of tailings & water by Dr Gavin Mudd - Pt 3
 
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http://cuttlefishcountry.com BHP Billiton's Olympic Dam mine is massive and destined to become the biggest open cut mine in the world. Naturally, with massive mines come massive impacts... environmentally, socially and economically. Widely published environmental engineer Dr Gavin Mudd (Monash University) gives this presentation on the impact the mining operation will have from the desert to the sea, and beyond through the export of dangerous radioactive materials. Tailings dams will leak radioactive waste into the earth in the South Australian desert, the water drawn from the Great Artesian Basin will continue to dry natural mound springs, threaten pastoral and agricultural bores and endanger arid zone ecology and indigenous sacred sites. Dr Gavin Mudd delivered this presentation in Adelaide, South Australia on October 9th, 2011... the day before the mega-mine project received environmental approval from both State and Federal Governments. You can find out more at http://cuttlefishcountry.com
Views: 564 danimations
H.K Mittal: Geotechnical Fundamentals of Uranium Tailings Management in Canada
 
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H.K. Mittal is a principal of H.K Mittal and Associates, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. H.K. Mittal discusses tailings pond design specific to uranium mines in northern Saskatchewan. The tailings ponds specifications come from over forty years of designing and operational experience with tailings pit ponds in Saskatchewan. Specific tailings pit design (a pervious round) and specific requirements for the tailings themselves (they must be consolidated) informs the operation of the mine especially during winter. Winter operations result in frozen tailings which are a liability since they must be thawed to get full consolidation of the tailings. These problems have led to disposal of the tailings underwater and then the surface water and the tailings are dewatered. Once the surface layer has dried down, a filter cloth is laid and then surface fill is spread while the surface layer is still frozen late in the spring. Highlights of the current practices are presented in the paper associated with this presentation. H.K. Mittal's presentation was part of the Tailings and Mine Waste Conference, Banff, Alberta on November 3-6, 2013.
Views: 371 LanduseKN
Uranium Mining In Virginia
 
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Uranium Mining In Virginia presentation at the VCN General Assembly Preview. Presented by Cale Jaffe, Southern Environmental Law Center.
Views: 198 VCNVAORG
Energy Futures Series Seminar 1: Uranium Mining - Geoffrey Fettus, Natural Resources Defense Council
 
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The Global Green USA Security and Sustainability Program launched a Seminar Series titled "Energy Futures: Nuclear Power, Global Warming, and Nonproliferation." The first seminar of the series focused on the environmental impacts of uranium mining. Geoffrey Fettus, is the Senior Project Attorney for the Nuclear Program at the Natural Resources Defense Council and discussed the legal complexities surrounding uranium mining laws.
Views: 286 Global Green USA
Cameco Uranium Project Raises More Than Environmental Concerns
 
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The final approval of the Kintyre mine will be left to the West Australian Environment Minister, following accusations from Traditional Owners and Environmental groups that the mine's existence will endanger not just the environment, but lives.
Views: 143 NITV News
Face to Face with Grahame Russell - Are Canadian mining companies getting away with murder?
 
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Grahame Russell of Rights Action joins us for a 30 minute interview about the health, environmental and other heinous human rights violations caused by Canadian mining companies in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador -- and about the impunity with which they operate. While our lying politicians and media tell us we are fighting for democracy in Libya and Afghanistan, we find out that really, Canadian Corporations are terrorists. This program is a shocking eye-opener. ©2011 Lazarus Productions
Views: 2729 Ictv Victoria
The truth about Uranium Mining in Canada by Candyce Paul, CNSC hearings La Ronge  SK
 
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Candyce Paul, a member of the English River First Nation in Northern Saskatchewan, makes her presentation to the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) at the hearings into uranium giant Cameco's application for re-licensing of its Key Lake, McArthur River and Rabbit Lake uranium mines.
Donna Dillman (CCAMU): Hunger Strike 2007 - ecoSanity.org
 
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CCAMU TO HOLD PUBLIC HEARINGS ON URANIUM MINING - DILLMAN TO END HUNGER STRIKE Thursday, December 13, 2007 The Community Coalition Against Mining Uranium (CCAMU) announced today that they would hold public hearings throughout Eastern Ontario in the New Year on the environmental and health impacts of uranium mining. "We have been asking the government to hold an inquiry into uranium mining and they have failed to respond" said Wolfe Erlichman of CCAMU. "In the absence of action, on behalf of the McGuinty government, we are going to hold a citizen's inquiry and invite the Premier to attend. We will even go to his home town to accommodate him." A number of NGO's including Greenpeace, Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, David Suzuki Foundation, Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility, Voice of Women and Sierra Club of Canada have endorsed the hearings or will participate as expert witnesses. CCAMU will be calling for public and expert submissions to take place at hearings to be held in Kingston, Ottawa and Peterborough in February/March. In response to the hearings, Donna Dillman, who has not eaten since October 8th 2007, said she will end her hunger strike. "I began this hunger strike to shine a light on the problem of uranium mining in eastern Ontario with the hope that Premier McGuinty would call a moratorium on further mining and exploration" said Dillman. "We have not yet got a moratorium but these hearings are a great opportunity to inform and educate Ontarians about some of the detrimental effects of uranium mining and to keep the pressure on the McGuinty government." "Donna has made an incredible personal sacrifice in pushing for this moratorium. It is time for the environmental community to take some of the heavy lifting from Donna before she suffers any serious health impacts" said Gideon Foreman, Executive Director of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment. "These hearings will be an opportunity to further expose the unfolding economic, health and environmental disaster associated with the global nuclear agenda" said Bruce Cox, Executive Director of Greenpeace Canada. "Mr. McGuinty is wrong when he says we need to mine uranium here to keep the lights on. This uranium is bound for export." Donna Dillman had not eaten since October 8th, 2007-a full 68 days ago. Ms. Dillman has been calling on Premier McGuinty to announce a moratorium on further mining and exploration in Eastern Ontario until a full public inquiry on the health and environmental impacts of uranium mining can take place. On Tuesday of this week Ms. Dillman stopped drinking juices and had been surviving solely on water. She ate her first bite of food in front of the supporters who had gathered in MPP Peter Tabuns' office, just after the press conference held in the Queen's Park press gallery. Four other women, Adriana Mugnatto-Hamu, Rita Bijons, Sharon Howarth and Karen Buck, had joined Dillman on her hunger strike this past Tuesday, to show their solidarity. They broke their fast today, just after Dillman ate a small amount of mashed squash. Contact: Lynn Daniluk Community Coalition Against Mining Uranium uraniumnews@mail.ccamu.ca
Views: 1168 climateye
WUS2015 Closing Remarks
 
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MATTHEW COON COME (CANADA, QC) Grand Chief, Grand Council of the Crees (Eeyou Istchee) THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium addressed issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium was organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future of nuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 28 Uranium2015
Dr. Gordon Edwards On Uranium Mining
 
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Dr. Gordon Edwards of the CCNR gives a brief overview of risks and issues particular to uranium mining, citing regulatory changes that could make it safer. But the question still remains: should uranium mining go ahead at all?
Views: 163 MiningWatch Canada
Virginia Uranium Mining Symposium
 
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World Expert Presentations On The Health And Socio-Economic Impacts Of Uranium Mining. These experts have written and spoken extensively on uranium mining and its impacts in the U.S. and around the globe. For more details on the issue visit www.keeptheban.org. Speakers: Dr. Doug Brugge: Tufts University Dr. Gordon Edwards:Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility Manuel Pino: American Indian Studies,Scottsdale Community College Paul Robinson: Southwest Research & Information Center Dr. Rianne Teule: Greenpeace International Sponsoring Organizations: Dan River Basin Association; Friends of the Earth, Piedmont Environmental Council; Sierra Club, Virginia Chapter; Southern Environmental Law Center; Virginia Conservation Network, and Virginia Interfaith Power and Light.
Views: 137 VCNVAORG
WUS2015 Global phase out of uranium mining & nuclear power: how to do it?
 
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GUNTER WIPPEL (GERMANY) Cofounder of Uranium Network and co-organizer of the first World Uranium Hearings (Austria, 1992) ANDREAS NIDECKER (SWITZERLAND) Physician, associate professor of Radiology University Basel, cofounder Physicians for Social Responsibility THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium addressed issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium was organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future of nuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 56 Uranium2015
WUS2015 Uranium mining and health issues in the USA
 
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DOUG BRUGGE (USA) Professor, Tufts University Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Co-editor of “The Navajo People and Uranium Mining” LEONA MORGAN (USA) Leona Morgan, Dene No Nukes, former coordinator Eastern Navajo Dine Against Uranium Mining THE SYMPOSIUM The World Uranium Symposium addressed issues arising from the nuclear fuel chain, from mining uranium to its end-uses and byproducts for civilian or military purposes. Both scientific and community-based, the Symposium was organized around the following themes: health, environment, economy, ethics, governance, human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Open to the public, the symposium had hosted more than 300 people per day from 14 to 16 April 2015, and had included local, national and international representatives from the sectors of health, research, industry, education, civil society, policy makers and indigenous communities. local, national and/or international media were present. All presentations of the symposium will be posted in electronic formats (text and / or videos) after the Symposium, in French and / or English. • April 14 (Day 1): Uranium mines and the nuclear life cycle : health and environmental issues • April 15 (Day 2): Civil and military nuclear : ethics, economics and political issues • April 16 (Day 3): Human rights, indigenous peoples' rights and governance issues ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED The Symposium is jointly organized by Physicians for Global Survival (1985 Nobel Peace Prize), the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment, Nature Québec, the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear Responsibility and the Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine. It also receives support from the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (Swiss chapter), the First Nations of Quebec and Labrador Sustainable Development Institute, the Cree Nation of Mistissini, MiningWatch Canada, and a number of other local, national and international partners. CONTEXT The Symposium is occurring at a time when many organizations and governments question the future of nuclear power, currently providing about 11% of the world’s electricity. The year 2015 also marks the seventieth anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the corresponding United Nations negotiations of the Non Proliferation Treaty for the prevention and the abolition of nuclear arms. It will also see the tabling on a new UN treaty on climate change. Canada is one of the largest producers and exporters of uranium worldwide, yet its nuclear energy output is in relative decline. Only two provinces still operate nuclear reactors: Ontario and New Brunswick. While uranium has been primarily mined from Saskatchewan, the provinces of British Columbia and Nova Scotia have officially banned uranium mining. Quebec recently shut down its sole nuclear reactor and has tasked the Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE) with conducting an investigation on issues related to uranium mining. It is expected to release its report by May 20 2015. The Symposium aims to tackle these different issues and to provide recommendations to decision makers to better ensure protection for the human health, global security and a safe environment
Views: 158 Uranium2015
Jennifer Moore, Canada's mining impacts in Latin America - 022412
 
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Jennifer Moore, Latin America Program Coordinator for Mining Watch Canada speaks about Canada's impact on Latin America including proposed legislation and the little victories that have been achieved - recorded for Straight Goods News by Samantha Bayard on Friday, February 24, 2012.
Views: 579 StraightGoodsNews
Uranium: Composition, Mining, Uses, Impact and Plausible Solutions (Science Project)
 
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SVN3E: Environmental Science, Grade 11, Workplace Preparation Unit 5: Natural Resource Science and Management Activity 3: The Price of Harvesting Our Natural Resources Work Cited "Google Maps." Google Maps. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Mar. 2016. (https://www.google.ca/maps/place/Cigar+Lake+Mine,+Division+No.+18,+Unorganized,+SK+S0J/@56.5572507,-112.5527863,4.25z/data=!4m2!3m1!1s0x524e689292ec829f:0x1da7ddba7bc795ca) "McArthur/Key Lake." Cameco.com- Canada. Cameco, n.d. Web. 11 Mar. 2016. (https://www.cameco.com/businesses/uranium-operations/canada/mcarthur-river-key-lake) "Uranium Processing - Canadian Nuclear Association." Canadian Nuclear Association RSS. Cna, n.d. Web. 12 Mar. 2016. (https://cna.ca/technology/energy/uranium-processing/) "Cameco Fuel Cycle - In-Situ Recovery Mining." YouTube. Cameco, n.d. Web. 25 Feb. 2016. (https://youtu.be/QZsJnJBRmFw) Cameco Fuel Cycle - Jet Bore Mining." YouTube. Cameco, n.d. Web. 26 Feb. 2016. (https://youtu.be/iCTrcXHyoHI) "Aerial View of Destruction Caused by Mount Polley Mine Tailings Pond Breach." YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 13 Mar. 2016. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FV_YpcwLIY8) "Uranium-mining-milling." Nuclearsafety.gc.ca. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Feb. 2016. (http://nuclearsafety.gc.ca/eng/resources/fact-sheets/uranium-mining-milling.cfm) "Uranium Mines and Mills Regulations (SOR/2000-206)." Legislative Services Branch. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Feb. 2016. (http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/sor-2000-206/page-2.html#docCont) "General Nuclear Safety and Control Regulations (SOR/2000-202)." Legislative Services Branch. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2016. (http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/SOR-2000-202/) "Pollution." Ec.gc.ca. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Mar. 2016. (https://www.ec.gc.ca/pollution/default.asp?lang=En&n=C6A98427-1) "Crescent-011.jpg." Wattsupwiththat.files.wordpress.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Mar. 2016. (https://wattsupwiththat.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/crescent-011.jpg) "Test at Tonopah Solar Project Ignites Hundreds of Birds in Mid-air." Watts Up With That. N.p., 02 Mar. 2015. Web. 12 Mar. 2016. (http://wattsupwiththat.com/2015/03/02/test-at-tonopah-solar-project-ignites-hundreds-of-birds-in-mid-air/)
Views: 290 eli parker